Fun Math Activities for the Summer

 

Math is everywhere, not just in the classroom, and summer is a great time to learn how math relates to the real world. It’s more than just addition and subtraction worksheets— it’s everywhere you look. Keep your child learning this summer with these ways to find math in the everyday.

Here are some great ideas:

 

Lemonade Stand

A lemonade stand is the quintessential summertime activity for kids, and math is needed to keep it up and running!

Younger kids can work on their measuring and money-counting by mixing the lemonade and making change for customers. Older kids can be in charge of setting the price by determining the cost per serving and setting a profit margin.

By using these math skills, your kids will have a successful business serving thirsty consumers all summer long!

 

Go Shopping

Math problems abound at the mall, and many stores have summertime sales. The next time your teen’s favorite store is having a sale, take her shopping. Ask her how much she will be saving on a certain sale item.

For example, if a $25 item is 20 percent off, how much does it cost?

You can mix and match different prices and discounts, add several sale items together, and even have your teen create an outfit with pre set budget.

She might be surprised to see how much percentages, fractions, and decimals play into one of her favorite pastimes!

 

Construction Kids

If your child loves being a little carpenter, it’s easy to turn his next summertime project into a math lesson. Whether you are building a tree house, a bird house, or simply have some extra wood and nails to play around with, break out the tape measure and let your child go to town.

Your child can help figure out square footage, measure angles, and determine how much wood is needed to cover a certain area. Older kids can help measure and cut wood to fit in a certain spot. He won’t even know he’s working on his algebra and geometry skills.

 

Countdown to Fun

Pool parties, picnics, and cookouts are all fun summer activities to look forward to. If your child has a fun event coming up, start a countdown. This lesson is two-fold — it’ll work on her time-telling skills, and it’ll help pass the time until the event.

For example, if she has a friend’s birthday party coming up in four days, ask her how long that is in days, hours, and minutes. You can even start a countdown for each of these. Her excitement will grow as each countdown winds down to her special event!


Aug 10, 2011 | Category: Math Tips | Comments: none

 


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